A profile of shaper Chris Jones: If you surf sooner or later you’ll end up at Chris Jones’ door. Who else can offer you fifty years of shaping experience? Who else was there at the beginning? CJ, legendary shaper/surfer, rugby fanatic, pasty connoisseur is this morning sanding down a vintage Tiki for restoration.

From WQS warrior to independent filmmaker via a AUS$27,000 debt, Johnny Abegg has trod an unconventional path through life so far, and proves that a relentlessly positive outlook and upbeat character can see you through the toughest times... Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Johnny Abegg

"I'm not interested in formulae when it comes to surfing and art." Ryan Lovelace talks to Chris Preston about trusting your eyes, hands, and feet, and adding another leaf to the weird-hull-alternative-vibe-tree. Photos: Morgan Maasen, Brandon DiPierri & Ryan Lovelace

Cyrus Sutton made an impression on the international film circuit with his 2003 breakthrough movie 'Riding Waves'. Now the EMMY award-winning documentary maker has turned his attention to the divergent surf scenes of Australia's Gold Coast and Byron Bay. Words: Tommy Leitch Photos: Courtesy of Cyrus Sutton

Rebel wave riders on a mission to enlighten the Western world to the true culture of the Middle East, blakkbox redefine the notion of surfers as beach bums who only care about the next wave. Photos: Cole Estrada & Anthony Allen

Kye Fitzgerald recounts the tale of the unusual return of Bobby Owens' magic board. Photos: Mark Onorati, Aitionn

We're all aware of Rio de Janeiro and its most famous charms - the football, carnival, Sugarloaf, Copacabana, Caipirinhas, the girls, the parties - but what of the city's surfing and the culture associated with it? Drift checks out the stand out characteristics of 'the marvellous city'! Photography: Benoit Fournier / www.benoit-fournier.com

Ian Battrick and Tim Nunn take a journey around the North Atlantic isle of Iceland to put the finishing touches to their book, out this Autumn. Join them on their journey.
Photos Tim Nunn and Ian Battrick Words Tim Nunn

The alaia has become something of a shining star in recent years. Mark Sankey shares a photo essay of Cornish alaia riders. Photos: Lionel Duffau, taken at Crantock and Bundoran.

Tucked away at the top of a hill near Gwenver beach in Cornwall, Skewjacks was the definitive 1970s surf camp. Drift took four of its founding fathers - Dicky, Harvey, Jamo and Mickey - to the pub and reminisced about good times gone by. Words: Jamie Bott Credit & thanks to Graham Shephard & Mel Sedgwick

Drift catches up with multi-award winning photographer Lucia Griggi whose office is the ocean and who is one of the most respected surf photographers in a male dominated industry. www.luciagriggi.com


Best goods | The Surf Café Cook Book


November 15, 2012 | Words By:

Shannon Denny recounts a tasty week on the wild Sligo coast.


When I joined a group of friends to explore the west coast of Ireland in the spring of last year, we scored ten days of sunshine and perfect waves more often than not. I was told this was a fluke, but didn’t care; by the time we were on the ferry headed home I’d come to understand that this part of the world is a magical place.

So when an editor I work for contacted me about working on a cookery book that would mean spending a week in the surf village of Strandhill where our gang had been based, I put down everything and fired up the Ryanair site. Myles and Jane Lamberth, owners of the renowned Shells café, were writing their first cookbook and I lucked into the amazing job of helping out by interviewing locals in order to include their stories in and among the recipes that would appear in the book.

It was December; it was freezing cold; it rained and snowed; Mullaghmore was breaking big and behaving like a deranged titan. But it didn’t matter because we spent every day watching with awe as Myles prepared dish after dish after dish, letting Jane drown us in coffee and laughter, witnessing photographer Mike Searles tirelessly do his thing, and chasing down publicans, farmers, foragers, fishermen, artisans, seaweed harvesters, shapers, Yeats experts, cheesemongers and surfers to be sure their voices came through in the book.

Myles’ cuisine sustained and inspired us. He’s effortless and catlike in the kitchen, cross-stepping in the chaos. His cooking belies a lifelong talent for wave sliding; there’s a deftness, balance and innate creativity that’s reminiscent of Joel Tudor riffing on a two-foot peeler. Behind the stove or on the water, he can turn something very simple into something sublime. It was the best time I’ve ever had on dry land, and that’s saying something. (Full disclosure: the Guinness, oysters, Irish potato cakes, more Guinness, homemade chutney and cheese sandwiches, lemon squares, Guinness, chowder, campervan casserole and flapjacks might have had something to do with it!)

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The Surf Café Cookbook is out now, £17.99 from Orca Publications.

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