Drift catches up with multi-award winning photographer Lucia Griggi whose office is the ocean and who is one of the most respected surf photographers in a male dominated industry. www.luciagriggi.com

Looking to the future with an eye firmly on the past, Tom Wegener has reintroduced the transport of kings to surfing's elite. His boards are works of art, but it's his veg patch that really floating Tom's boat right now... Words: Tommy Leitch Photos: Jamie Bott

When the ‘Apocalypse Now’ film crew packed up and left the Philippine coastal town of Baler, they left one important item behind – a surfboard. More than 30 years on and this quiet backwater is home to a stoked crew of welcoming locals. Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Alexa Poppe

A sign on the 130-year-old pier at Saltburn-by-the-Sea warns people not to jump off it. On a big surf day surfers make their way to the end of the sturdy 206 metre structure and jump like lemmings into the cold, murky North Sea. Words: Simon Palmer Photos: Ian Forsyth

Cyrus Sutton made an impression on the international film circuit with his 2003 breakthrough movie 'Riding Waves'. Now the EMMY award-winning documentary maker has turned his attention to the divergent surf scenes of Australia's Gold Coast and Byron Bay. Words: Tommy Leitch Photos: Courtesy of Cyrus Sutton

From WQS warrior to independent filmmaker via a AUS$27,000 debt, Johnny Abegg has trod an unconventional path through life so far, and proves that a relentlessly positive outlook and upbeat character can see you through the toughest times... Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Johnny Abegg

Portugal explodes onto the global big wave circuit with a handful of household names and a freakish wave canyon. Photos: Jorge Leal and Wilson Ribeiro.

In Florianopolis - Brazil's surf capital - during prime swell season, an incomplete line-up gets Clare Howdle thinking... (Photos 2, 3, 4&8: André Côrtes; photos 1&7: Zander Grinfeld, www.venncreative.co.uk)

...in the age of the programmable hand. San Diego's Josh Hall explains why he has chosen to tread the well-worn path of hand-shaping, in conversation with Andy Smith. Photos: Garrett Highhouse, T. Colla, Ryan Tatar

Jimmy Newitt pays homage to one of South Devon's treasures - not a break but a surfer who stands tall in the crowd. Words: Jimmy Newitt Photos: Ollie Howe

Meet Nick Blair of Joistik Surfboards, whose distinctive decal gets a regular flashing as some of the Gold Coast's best surfers do their thing. Photos & words: Mat Arney


Best goods | The Surf Café Cook Book


November 15, 2012 | Words By:

Shannon Denny recounts a tasty week on the wild Sligo coast.


When I joined a group of friends to explore the west coast of Ireland in the spring of last year, we scored ten days of sunshine and perfect waves more often than not. I was told this was a fluke, but didn’t care; by the time we were on the ferry headed home I’d come to understand that this part of the world is a magical place.

So when an editor I work for contacted me about working on a cookery book that would mean spending a week in the surf village of Strandhill where our gang had been based, I put down everything and fired up the Ryanair site. Myles and Jane Lamberth, owners of the renowned Shells café, were writing their first cookbook and I lucked into the amazing job of helping out by interviewing locals in order to include their stories in and among the recipes that would appear in the book.

It was December; it was freezing cold; it rained and snowed; Mullaghmore was breaking big and behaving like a deranged titan. But it didn’t matter because we spent every day watching with awe as Myles prepared dish after dish after dish, letting Jane drown us in coffee and laughter, witnessing photographer Mike Searles tirelessly do his thing, and chasing down publicans, farmers, foragers, fishermen, artisans, seaweed harvesters, shapers, Yeats experts, cheesemongers and surfers to be sure their voices came through in the book.

Myles’ cuisine sustained and inspired us. He’s effortless and catlike in the kitchen, cross-stepping in the chaos. His cooking belies a lifelong talent for wave sliding; there’s a deftness, balance and innate creativity that’s reminiscent of Joel Tudor riffing on a two-foot peeler. Behind the stove or on the water, he can turn something very simple into something sublime. It was the best time I’ve ever had on dry land, and that’s saying something. (Full disclosure: the Guinness, oysters, Irish potato cakes, more Guinness, homemade chutney and cheese sandwiches, lemon squares, Guinness, chowder, campervan casserole and flapjacks might have had something to do with it!)

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The Surf Café Cookbook is out now, £17.99 from Orca Publications.

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