Drift catches up with multi-award winning photographer Lucia Griggi whose office is the ocean and who is one of the most respected surf photographers in a male dominated industry. www.luciagriggi.com

The alaia has become something of a shining star in recent years. Mark Sankey shares a photo essay of Cornish alaia riders. Photos: Lionel Duffau, taken at Crantock and Bundoran.

Flitting between awesome waves at Aileens and Nelscott Reef is all in a week's work for Ireland's big-wave master Al Mennie. Words: Al Mennie Photos: Al Mennie, Gary McCall, Larry Jansky, Richard Hallman

London ad exec Tom Birmingham set off in November in search of adventure on the Southwest Indian coastline. Accompanied by guesthouse owners Ed and Sofie of Soul and Surf in Kerala, he soon found himself surfing uncharted waves to an audience of school children and fisherman. Words and Photos: Tom Birmingham

Chris Burkard's photographs are about more than barrels, perfect point breaks, and carving radical lines – they capture a moment in which the surfer is a mere player and the real star is the scenery. Words: Dan Hamlin Photos: Chris Burkard

Dreamt up over 20 years ago by Renaud and Thomas Cardinal, two French brothers with a passion for board making, UWL has grown to become one of the biggest factories in Europe, while building a reputation based on performance and quality. Rui Ribeiro talks with Renaud about the past, present and future of UWL...

They're trained to defend their country and protect our freedom and liberty, but when active service is over, many soldiers find themselves struggling with personal and mental problems that the army just doesn't want to know about. Could surfing provide some answers? Words & photos: Russ Pierre

Mark Leary's latest work deviates sharply from the usual surf photography portfolio, celebrating as it does the commonplace, everyday aspects of surfing instead of monster swells and awesome barrels. Chris Preston chats to him about moments captured.

The Mentawais have given a lot to surfers; now it's time to give something back. Kate and Luke Gerson celebrate the beauty of these islands and highlight the continued need for aid following the recent earthquake.

Mark Sankey and Alexa Poppe discover Autumn's aquatic gifts in a late September road trip spanning France and Spain. Words: Mark Sankey. Photos and Design: Alexa Poppe

Self-confessed board hoarder Chris Preston expounds the delights to be found within his tardis-like garden shed, and explains how he came to favour the quiver approach to surfing. Photos by Jamie Bott [except no.3].


Fukushima Radiation FAQ


February 12, 2014 | Words By:

Fukushima Radiation FAQFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ) addressing how the Fukushima nuclear meltdown in Japan is affecting the health and safety of those living along the Eastern Pacific (West Coast of the US and Canada). Originally published by Surfrider Foundation, written by Rick Wilson and Chad Nelson.


1. Is Surfrider tracking concerns that radiation from Fukushima is affecting the West Coast?

Yes. We are carefully following the results of scientific studies that are being conducted to evaluate the potential spread of radiation from Fukushima to the Pacific Coast via air, water and marine life. We have summarized these issues and have provided links to further information in our Beachapedia article Radiation From Fukushima. We are updating this article constantly. www.beachapedia.org

2. Is the news out there regarding Fukushima correct and accurate?

There are a lot of conflicting reports in the news and on various websites and blogs. There have been many sensationalist reports that are not supported by scientific data and studies. Again, we’ve summarized the latest verifiable data and reports in our Beachapedia article, which also contains links to responses to some of the blogs and news reports that have raised concerns. An example is this article written by a Surfrider Foundation staff scientist that was published in The Inertia. www.theinertia.com

3. Is it safe along the Pacific coast?

Depending on where you are and the conditions on any particular day, recreating near and in the ocean involves many inherent dangers, including dangerous waves, rip currents, water polluted by sewage or storm runoff, stingrays, jellyfish and sharks. However, scientific data collected to date does not indicate a cause for concern with regard to concentrations of Fukushima-derived radiation in air, seawater or seafood along the Pacific Coast. Concentrations of Cesium -137 in the North Pacific Ocean were actually at least 10 times higher in the 1960s (a result of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s and 60s) than concentrations measured in January 2014 along the Pacific Coast.

4. Where can I find reliable information on the potential affects of radiation along the Pacific coast?

Refer to our Beachapedia article and the links/references in that article.

6. Are you testing/checking for radiation?

Although accurately testing for low levels of radioactivity in air, water or seafood is beyond technical and financial capabilities of Surfrider Foundation, we are closely following the results of scientists who are conducting such testing.

We also encourage groups and individuals who are interested in collecting seawater samples for testing to participate in a crowdsourced radiation monitoring program being conducted by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. See ourradioactiveocean.com

7. What is Surfrider’s position regarding Fukushima?

The Surfrider Foundation US does not have a formal position on Fukushima itself. For issues in Japan we defer to our affiliate Surfrider Japan. That said, it’s clear that the impact of the earthquake and associated tsunami are a cautionary tale about building any industrial facility and especially nuclear facilities close to the shore where they can be impacted by geologic hazards, tsunamis, strong storms and rising sea level. We believe that any large industrial facility that could pose threats to human health or the environment should be set back far from the ocean and carefully planned with these risks taken into account.

Here’s another good FAQ from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

www.surfrider.org

Illustration by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Illustration by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

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3 Comments


  1. Tokyo Electric Admits Withholding Stronitum 90 Readings
    February 11th, 2014 Fukushima – SimplyInfo

    Tokyo Electric has admitted Tokyo Electric knew about the extremely high strontium 90 readings and the issues with Tokyo Electric testing equipment back in July 2013 but did NOT make any of this information public.
    The timing makes the issue even more suspect since the bid for the Olympics was being decided about the same time.

    Tokyo Electric knew of the record high 5 million bq/liter strontium 90 reading in July 2013 but decided it was “inaccurate” and chose NOT to disclose it. Tokyo Electric has had a track record of declaring inconveniently high readings to be inaccurate before. Tokyo Electric did so on an early scope inspection of unit 1′s torus room where Tokyo Electric released the reading but insisted the meter failed.

    Tokyo Electric earlier explanation for the strontium 90 readings being wrong was that Tokyo Electric did NOT know the readings were wrong and gave lower levels to the public. Now Tokyo Electric admits Tokyo Electric knew about the error and what the correct readings were the entire time.

    1
  2. Take a Stand against TEPCO!

    2
  3. However you turn it, this sucks :/

    3
  4. Michael Faust says:

    Rad levels will reach 47 to 530 Bq/CF in the pacific

    4
  5. jeff bockhurst says:

    we will all die

    5


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