A profile of shaper Chris Jones: If you surf sooner or later you’ll end up at Chris Jones’ door. Who else can offer you fifty years of shaping experience? Who else was there at the beginning? CJ, legendary shaper/surfer, rugby fanatic, pasty connoisseur is this morning sanding down a vintage Tiki for restoration.

A surfer from Noosa's sun drenched shores obsessed with the dark world of gothic horror, Jai Lee's personal struggles and addiction to noseriding have twisted his creativity. Words: Chris Preston Photos: Thomas Robinson (pp 1&3), Andy Staley (pp4)and Dane Peterson

When it comes to surfcraft there's a newcomer making waves. Drift discovers the new world of handplaning with Cornwall's finest craftsmen. Words: Clare Howdle

Richard James and his brother Andrew recently finished shooting their first film, a surf trip of 30,000 kilometres along the west cost of Africa. Words and photos: Richard James

A world away from the average commercial surf competition, pushy dads and nervous groms, generations share the stoke at a contest that celebrates the original Hawaiian spirit. This is truly a unique perspective in surfing. Photos: Yves S

A shaper with a real passion for his craft, Tyler Hatzikian has consistently refused to compromise the quality or the integrity of his work in order to make a quick buck. He talked to Drift about nose-riding, refining longboard design and his reluctance to take the limelight. Words & photos: Jamie Bott

From WQS warrior to independent filmmaker via a AUS$27,000 debt, Johnny Abegg has trod an unconventional path through life so far, and proves that a relentlessly positive outlook and upbeat character can see you through the toughest times... Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Johnny Abegg

The Sunshine Coast. Home to some of the world's most accomplished surfers, including marquee names like Julian Wilson and Mitch Coleborn. As a result, the region is fast becoming a breeding ground for some of the most progressive young surfers that Australia, and the world, has ever seen.

Surfboards come in all shapes and sizes, but none quite so unusual as the Meyerhoffer Peanut. Is this revolutionary design born of genius or madness? Chris Stevens finds out. [Photos 1, 3 & 8 by Chris Stevens; 4 & 7 by Nick Allen]

Portugal explodes onto the global big wave circuit with a handful of household names and a freakish wave canyon. Photos: Jorge Leal and Wilson Ribeiro.

Chris Brunt chats to west Penwith's prodigal son and professional journeyman Sam Bleakley about his thirst for adventure and love of longboarding. [All photos by Chris Brunt.]


Fukushima Radiation FAQ


February 12, 2014 | Words By:

Fukushima Radiation FAQFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ) addressing how the Fukushima nuclear meltdown in Japan is affecting the health and safety of those living along the Eastern Pacific (West Coast of the US and Canada). Originally published by Surfrider Foundation, written by Rick Wilson and Chad Nelson.


1. Is Surfrider tracking concerns that radiation from Fukushima is affecting the West Coast?

Yes. We are carefully following the results of scientific studies that are being conducted to evaluate the potential spread of radiation from Fukushima to the Pacific Coast via air, water and marine life. We have summarized these issues and have provided links to further information in our Beachapedia article Radiation From Fukushima. We are updating this article constantly. www.beachapedia.org

2. Is the news out there regarding Fukushima correct and accurate?

There are a lot of conflicting reports in the news and on various websites and blogs. There have been many sensationalist reports that are not supported by scientific data and studies. Again, we’ve summarized the latest verifiable data and reports in our Beachapedia article, which also contains links to responses to some of the blogs and news reports that have raised concerns. An example is this article written by a Surfrider Foundation staff scientist that was published in The Inertia. www.theinertia.com

3. Is it safe along the Pacific coast?

Depending on where you are and the conditions on any particular day, recreating near and in the ocean involves many inherent dangers, including dangerous waves, rip currents, water polluted by sewage or storm runoff, stingrays, jellyfish and sharks. However, scientific data collected to date does not indicate a cause for concern with regard to concentrations of Fukushima-derived radiation in air, seawater or seafood along the Pacific Coast. Concentrations of Cesium -137 in the North Pacific Ocean were actually at least 10 times higher in the 1960s (a result of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s and 60s) than concentrations measured in January 2014 along the Pacific Coast.

4. Where can I find reliable information on the potential affects of radiation along the Pacific coast?

Refer to our Beachapedia article and the links/references in that article.

6. Are you testing/checking for radiation?

Although accurately testing for low levels of radioactivity in air, water or seafood is beyond technical and financial capabilities of Surfrider Foundation, we are closely following the results of scientists who are conducting such testing.

We also encourage groups and individuals who are interested in collecting seawater samples for testing to participate in a crowdsourced radiation monitoring program being conducted by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. See ourradioactiveocean.com

7. What is Surfrider’s position regarding Fukushima?

The Surfrider Foundation US does not have a formal position on Fukushima itself. For issues in Japan we defer to our affiliate Surfrider Japan. That said, it’s clear that the impact of the earthquake and associated tsunami are a cautionary tale about building any industrial facility and especially nuclear facilities close to the shore where they can be impacted by geologic hazards, tsunamis, strong storms and rising sea level. We believe that any large industrial facility that could pose threats to human health or the environment should be set back far from the ocean and carefully planned with these risks taken into account.

Here’s another good FAQ from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

www.surfrider.org

Illustration by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Illustration by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

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3 Comments


  1. Tokyo Electric Admits Withholding Stronitum 90 Readings
    February 11th, 2014 Fukushima – SimplyInfo

    Tokyo Electric has admitted Tokyo Electric knew about the extremely high strontium 90 readings and the issues with Tokyo Electric testing equipment back in July 2013 but did NOT make any of this information public.
    The timing makes the issue even more suspect since the bid for the Olympics was being decided about the same time.

    Tokyo Electric knew of the record high 5 million bq/liter strontium 90 reading in July 2013 but decided it was “inaccurate” and chose NOT to disclose it. Tokyo Electric has had a track record of declaring inconveniently high readings to be inaccurate before. Tokyo Electric did so on an early scope inspection of unit 1′s torus room where Tokyo Electric released the reading but insisted the meter failed.

    Tokyo Electric earlier explanation for the strontium 90 readings being wrong was that Tokyo Electric did NOT know the readings were wrong and gave lower levels to the public. Now Tokyo Electric admits Tokyo Electric knew about the error and what the correct readings were the entire time.

    1
  2. Take a Stand against TEPCO!

    2
  3. However you turn it, this sucks :/

    3
  4. Michael Faust says:

    Rad levels will reach 47 to 530 Bq/CF in the pacific

    4
  5. jeff bockhurst says:

    we will all die

    5


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