Matt Rohrer shares some of the highlights of his conversations with Bay Area surfer Jimmy Holt, focal point of one of the few surfing photos to ever appear in National Geographic Magazine. Selected photos: Jim Shaw

In Senegal the deserts of North Africa meet the jungles of the tropics. It's an open–minded Islamic country of many cultural experiences and idiosyncrasies; it's also one of the safest and democratic countries in Africa. And of course there's the surf... Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Alexa Poppe

When the ‘Apocalypse Now’ film crew packed up and left the Philippine coastal town of Baler, they left one important item behind – a surfboard. More than 30 years on and this quiet backwater is home to a stoked crew of welcoming locals. Words: Mark Sankey Photos: Alexa Poppe

Big-wave riding is an awe-inspiring experience, but what happens when things go wrong? In an exclusive extract from his new book, Al Mennie explains what it's like to survive the mother of all wipeouts.

The alaia has become something of a shining star in recent years. Mark Sankey shares a photo essay of Cornish alaia riders. Photos: Lionel Duffau, taken at Crantock and Bundoran.

Mark Sankey and Alexa Poppe uncover the isolation and challenges of the Mentawai Islands, and consider the challenge of balancing tourism and sustainability, in an environmentally sensitive surfing destination.


SAS Spring beach clean 2013

January 29, 2013 | Words By: Hugo

Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) is calling on coastal communities to get involved with the SAS Big Spring Beach Clean on 22nd, 23rd & 24th March to help tackle the marine litter crisis hitting UK shores.


SAS is encouraging community volunteers to lead their own beach cleans as part of the SAS Big Spring Beach Clean, offering advice, equipment and promotional materials to ensure safe and successful events. All lead volunteers will also receive a limited edition Klean Kanteen©; a refillable, safe, healthy, lightweight, reusable bottle free of Bisphenol A (BPA) and other toxin substances.
The SAS Big Spring Beach Clean will take place between 11am and 2pm on 22nd, 23rd & 24th March, so get ready to roll up your sleeves for UK beaches. For more details and to register your event please contact SAS on 01872 553 001 or email dom@sas.org.uk

Sadly, the springtime reveals the true severity of the marine litter crisis. The impact of winter storms and in absence of seasonal council beach cleaning operations, the accumulation of litter can be truly shocking. Typical examples of marine litter include rubbish from beach users, sewage-related debris, waste from commercial shipping, nets and fish boxes from fishing vessels and medical waste.

Marine litter is thought to reduce the resiliance of marine ecosystems and add to other human impacts on the marine environment such as inappropriate development, sewage and agricultural pollution, climate change and ocean acidification (Derraik, 2002). Marine litter can also dramatically affect quality of life, recreational opportunities and aesthetic value. The majority of beach users rank cleanliness as a priority in chosing their destination. A 2005 ENCAMS study showed that 97% of people avoided beaches with 10 or more large litter items per metre.

Hugo Tagholm, SAS Executive Director says: “The marine litter crisis is a major issue hitting beautiful beaches right around the UK. The SAS Big Spring Beach Clean empowers communities and educates the public on how we can all play our part in turning the tide of marine litter.”

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