Drift catches up with multi-award winning photographer Lucia Griggi whose office is the ocean and who is one of the most respected surf photographers in a male dominated industry. www.luciagriggi.com

God Went Surfing with The Devil is a film by Alex Klein, which documents the war-torn region of Gaza. At a time when tensions are high, this film investigates the attitudes and aspirations of a small pocket of people where surfing removes socio-political divisions and lets the ocean carry their aspirations for peace.

Kye Fitzgerald recounts the tale of the unusual return of Bobby Owens' magic board. Photos: Mark Onorati, Aitionn

Sean Mattison has a reputation as a designer, a coach, and a businessman. His competitive experience, retail background and knowledge acquired from testing hundreds of surfboards made him one of the most versatile surfers in California. Words: Rui Ribeiro.

Tucked away at the top of a hill near Gwenver beach in Cornwall, Skewjacks was the definitive 1970s surf camp. Drift took four of its founding fathers - Dicky, Harvey, Jamo and Mickey - to the pub and reminisced about good times gone by. Words: Jamie Bott Credit & thanks to Graham Shephard & Mel Sedgwick

Mark Leary's latest work deviates sharply from the usual surf photography portfolio, celebrating as it does the commonplace, everyday aspects of surfing instead of monster swells and awesome barrels. Chris Preston chats to him about moments captured.

A tale of surfing reefs in South Africa, but not knowing what you get yourself into. Drift contributor Tim Conibear points a finger at localism and finds three more pointing right back. Photos: Mike Reich

Mark Sankey and Alexa Poppe head through Spain and Portugal in search of a surfing paradise.

Surfboards come in all shapes and sizes, but none quite so unusual as the Meyerhoffer Peanut. Is this revolutionary design born of genius or madness? Chris Stevens finds out. [Photos 1, 3 & 8 by Chris Stevens; 4 & 7 by Nick Allen]

James Bowden kissed goodbye to Blighty and set off for Tasmania's wild in January this year. He shares some of his findings along the way with his own distinctive style.

Matt Rohrer shares some of the highlights of his conversations with Bay Area surfer Jimmy Holt, focal point of one of the few surfing photos to ever appear in National Geographic Magazine. Selected photos: Jim Shaw


The Alley Fish Fry


January 21, 2013 | Words By:

It all started with the fish when the innovative shapers and board builders out there decided to revisit the past for some inspiration. In doing so they brought back some lost skills such as resin tints and hand foiled fins.The Fish Fry has been a place for these fine craftsmen to showcase their skills.


We have seen some amazing boards as shapers have pushed the boundaries over the last few years. As this new look at the fish has evolved to its many forms, it has influenced other shapes and designs along the way.This has spawned a renewed interest in other board forms by this same group and a wider following. Notably the Mini Simmons, Hulls, old school Logs and Pigs.

It is pleasing to note that there are an increasing number of people building their own boards as well.All of this is to be applauded and celebrated as a positive for surfing. So it is only natural that these shapers and board builders continue to share their skills with us and include these other shapes at the Fish Fry. It has truly become a melting pot of ideas for like minded people.

thealleyfishfry.blogspot.com

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  1. Guys thanks for your continued support. It is much appreciated.

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